photos
October 17th, 2017
Beaches Living Guide Spring/Summer 2017




Jewish kensington market & beyond

INTERESTING FACTS...

  • Beach Hebrew Institute, Toronto's First Synagogue – 109 Kenilworth Ave

May is Jewish Heritage Month in Ontario, in recognition to the Jewish contribution.



In 1920, Jewish residents in the Beaches purchased the old Baptist Church at the corner of Queen St. E. and Kenilworth Ave. Te building was moved to its present location and re-oriented to face east. Today, the synagogue is now an integral part of the 'Beach' community. Te synagogue joins local churches and offers a mid-week lunchtime drop-in program.

Toronto's frst Jewish community was in Te Ward where from 1890 to the early 1920s, it was the dominant cultural group, but as the Ward became increasingly crowded, Jewish merchants looked for another place to set up businesses. At the time, they were excluded from the main business community, so merchants set up an outdoor market in what we now know as Kensington Market, west of Spadina to Augusta and north of Dundas to Nassau.

At frst, merchants sold goods from handcarts pushed through the working-class streets, then set up stalls on lawns in front of their homes. Tis attracted other merchants, including Kosher meat processing. Eventually, many merchants converted the ground floor of their houses to stores, as well as continuing to display goods on the sidewalks, as is done today.

By the 1920s, about 80 percent of the city's Jewish population of 35,000 lived in and around Kensington, worshipping at over 30 local synagogues. It was a this time that the area was known as the "Jewish Market", even though other immigrants also set up independent shops, looking for specialty goods at reasonable prices.

At the same time, the numerous textile and fabric factories and warehouses in the area needed factory workers. Because most of the city's Jewish community lived in the immediate area, many found employment in the garment industry. Shops, delis, and amenities sprung up in the area to provide for the bustling community. Spadina Avenue was known as the main street of the city's Jewish community. To this day, when you walk along Queen St. W. past Spadina Ave. you see the signs "Fashion District", whose name is derived from the area's role in the garment industry.

Work conditions in the industry, however, were harsh. It was Jewish community leaders who led the way advocating for improved conditions through fair labour laws.

It began with two Jewish businessmen in the area who frst formed a cooperative. Teir work lead to the establishment of the Labor Lyceum Association, a labour union, which for many years was located on Spadina Avenue. Long after labour laws had been reformed, the Association remained an important cultural centre for the Jewish community in Toronto, and a welcoming place for new arrivals to the city.

By mid century, the Jewish presence in Kensington Market gradually diminished, but the influence of the Jewish Canadian culture remains woven into the entire, diverse culture of the city. For example, many recognize Te Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre (MNjcc) at the corner of Bloor and Spadina. Troughout its 60+ year history, the membership has been 50 percent Jewish and 50 percent non–Jewish, reflecting the community's wide and diverse population.

Featured Beaches
History & Landmarks
In Published Issues:


Spring & Summer 2017


Fall & Winter 2016/2017


Spring & Summer 2016


Fall & Winter 2016


Spring & Summer 2015


Fall & Winter 2014/2015


SPRING & SUMMER 2015


FALL & WINTER 2013/14


SPRING & SUMMER 2013


FALL & WINTER 2012


SPRING & SUMMER 2012


FALL & WINTER 2011


SPRING & SUMMER 2011


FALL & WINTER 2010/11


SPRING / SUMMER 2010


FALL / WINTER 2009-10


SPRING / SUMMER 2009


FALL / WINTER 2008-09


SPRING / SUMMER 2008


FALL / WINTER 2007-08


SPRING / SUMMER 2007


FALL / WINTER 2006-07


SPRING / SUMMER 2006


FALL / WINTER 2005-06


SPRING / SUMMER 2005


SUMMER / WINTER 2004-05