photos
July 23rd, 2014

Can You Name the Top 10?

STEEP STREETS - in the Beaches

If you live in the Beaches, you know we have steep streets, but do you know why, and can you name the steepest?

We've done some research on this fascinating subject, and put together a list of the 10 steepest streets in the Beaches.

1. Scarborough Rd. - around Queen St.
2. Silver Birch Ave. - most of the street
3. Glenmanor Dr - between Kingston Rd. and Beaufort Rd.
4. Lee Ave. - between Kingston Rd. and Juniper Ave.
5. Spruce Hill Rd. - around Sycamore Pl.
6. Balsam Ave. - between Pine Ave. and Sycamore Pl.
7. Glenmore Rd. - between Eastwood Ave. and Duvernet Ave.
8. Kingswood Rd.- around Queen St.
9. Waverley Rd. - between Kingston Rd. and Norway Ave.
10. Winthorpe Rd. - between Kingston Rd. and Glen Stewart Ave.

The reason we always seem to be walking uphill is that the Beaches sits on top of a huge bar of gravel and sand. This bar was created many thousands of years ago by the glacial Lake Iroquois, which once covered what is now downtown Toronto.

About 10,000 years ago, the waters of Lake Iroquois receded to become Lake Ontario. This process exposed a clay plain on which the city of Toronto now stands. As well, it uncovered the East Toronto bar, which extends westward from the Scarborough Bluffs for almost 6.4 kilometres and rises more than 56 metres above the lake. Kingston Road was built along the top of the bar.

The Davenport bar is the other bar in Toronto, a little smaller, it caused the present Humber River to flow due south.

Early motorists often had a tough time getting up the hills in winter. To make a little cash, children would collect the coal ashes which had been put out for pickup by the city and sell them to drivers to place under their tires.

The step inclines were also a source of pleasure. Mrs. Norman Keys, whose family moved to the Beaches in 1901, recalled the thrill of sledding down Beech Avenue on home-made bob sleighs that held six or eight riders. "They started above Pine and went down over Queen Street where one person was stationed with a flag to warn of the rare on-coming street car, down, almost to the club house."

Aknowledgment: The Changing Face of Toronto, by Donald Kerr and Jacob Spelt.


Please send your comments about our featured articles to info@beachesliving.ca. Also let us know what subject would you like to see in our future issues.

Featured Beaches
History & Landmarks
In Published Issues:


FALL & WINTER 2013/14


SPRING & SUMMER 2013


FALL & WINTER 2012


SPRING & SUMMER 2012


FALL & WINTER 2011


SPRING & SUMMER 2011


FALL & WINTER 2010/11


SPRING / SUMMER 2010


FALL / WINTER 2009-10


SPRING / SUMMER 2009


FALL / WINTER 2008-09


SPRING / SUMMER 2008


FALL / WINTER 2007-08


SPRING / SUMMER 2007


FALL / WINTER 2006-07


SPRING / SUMMER 2006


FALL / WINTER 2005-06


SPRING / SUMMER 2005


SUMMER / WINTER 2004-05